The Simplex SP22 & SP24 Searchcoils – My Take!

Preface

I had every intention of doing a very detailed evaluation of the Nokta SP22 and SP24 searchcoils. Yup, I actually started experimenting with the now hip and trendy “coins vs. nails” board game and guess what? The results were pretty much what I thought they would be – The 11” stock coil wasn’t as good at the separation/isolation thing as the 8½ inch, the 8½ inch wasn’t as good as the 9½ x 5, and no matter the layout if I fooled around long enough and scanned at a gazillion different angles I could get a valid response.

The more I continued the more I realized that none of it made a lot of sense. I was in the backyard switching out coils, playing with a 2 x 4, a small  piece of plywood, an assortment of coins, nails, tabs and bottlecaps, trying to keep track of and record all the various combinations thinking to myself “what the hell are the odds that any of these scenarios will ever occur”? I mean I don’t run into many 2 x 4’s when I’m out detecting and yeah I know there’s always the possibility that an iron nail might be lying directly on top of a coin, but hey I’m willing to live dangerously and see what happens.

Now I understand many of you hunt iron infested sites and DO want to know all these variables so let me suggest John Schmidt’s videos. He does a yeoman’s job and covers all the scenarios (his depth tests pretty much mirrored mine). Me personally? I’m more concerned how these coils will perform at the few sites currently available to me (yeah I’m a pretty selfish bastard).

So what do I look for in new equipment? Very simply, does it perform as advertised, does it suit my needs, is it a noticeable improvement over what I already have and is it worth the investment.

“My take” on the SP24 (9½ x 5 DD elliptical) and the SP22 (8½ in DD)

If you read my recent review of the Nokta Simplex+ you know that I was impressed with it. It comes standard with an 11 inch DD coil and despite it’s size it was very good at separating the good from the bad. So much so that I was anxious to see what the smaller 8½ inch coil could do and bought it. As luck would have it the folks at Nokta/Makro sent me the 9½ x 5 to review and I now have the best of both three worlds.

Both the sp24 and sp22 coils are waterproof, have a suggested retail price of $129 and will only work with Simplex detectors that have updates 2.76 and above. There’s also a rumor that you have to do a reset when changing out coils. NOT TRUE!  Just change it out and go.

I decided that the best way I could evaluate both coils was to take them to areas that had an abundance of trash. Areas that previously I had to skip or hunt with high disc settings. Two in particular came to mind…one was a picnic area in a small park across the lake. The other a large corner lot that I recently hunted with the Simplex and had to notch out 0 – 30 to find anything. I also took the advice of my daughter Molly and spent a morning detecting a lake and picnic area that was part of a multi-field soccer complex.

I started at the park across the lake and quickly realized I need to get two additional lower rods* and pronto. Having to change out coils and play around with the nut and bolt pieces was a pain but I did want to use one after the other as opposed to just using one for a few days and then using the other. I figured that way all the variables would be the same, including my aches, pains and moods.

Where I searched

The park has three small picnic pavilions and the areas around them have been to difficult to work due to an abundance of tabs, bottlecaps and foil. I started out with the 8½ inch coil and set the Simplex to Park I, the sensitivity to 5 bars and started scanning, albeit somewhat slowly. The SP22 was a a tad bit noisy but notably better than the stock 11 inch and after about 30/45 minutes of finessing my swings I was able to isolate and get good readouts on a few coins including two wheaties and a couple of nickels, which heretofore had been ignored in favor of my back. Nothing old and nothing deeper than 5 inches.

SP22 finds – note the very affordable, super deluxe, two tone, waterproof and washable coin pouch compliments of le Home Dépôt!!

Next I replaced the 8½ inch with the 9½ X 5 (SP24), kept the identical settings and gave the same general area another 30/45 minutes and it seemed even better at cherry picking. I was able to isolate another ten or twelve keepers, one of them a silver dime.  Again nothing deeper than 5 or 6 inches. I need to also mention that pinpointing with both the SP22 and SP24 is a breeze with the sweet spot being located under the Nokta label.

SP24 finds – add these finds to the ones above, give me a pat on the back and send me a bottle of Aleve because that’s a lot of getting up and down for me!

Couple days later I ventured to the corner lot I mentioned above and again gave both coils about 3o minutes. I left with two pennies, a headache and a vow not to hunt there again. Just too much litter in and on the ground.

The athletic/soccer complex was a much more pleasant experience. I went early in the morning and had the lake and picnic area all to myself and I don’t know about you but  being in pleasant surroundings will often make for a good day and more than compensate for any lack of finds. Anyway I spent a total of two hours here, using both coils and again did most of my searching in the immediate area of a large pavilion. I left with a handful of coins, all new and nothing to write home about.

I did return twice more to the small park across the lake and gave the 9½ x 5 a shot in the more open areas. I found a few routine shekels and was pleased with the effort.

Conclusion

Both the 8½ inch and the 9½ x 5 performed as they should and by that I mean the footprint of both are what you’d expect from coils this size and shape. The round SP22 will offer a tad more depth in a reasonably clean area while the SP24 (elliptical) will perform better in trashy areas.

I’ve decided to leave the 9½ x 5 on my detector for the time being but will have the 8½ ready to go (mounted on lower rod). I’m hoping too the folks at Nokta/Makro will consider offering a smaller coil, maybe 5 to 6 inches.

I didn’t test these coils in the water, on the beach, nor did I do any relic hunting. I didn’t find gold, nor did I have one of those “I dug down fifteen inches and low and behold” moments but I enjoyed using both the SP22 and SP24 and feel comfortable in saying both coils are as advertised and either one or both would be a great addition to your Simplex+ arsenal.

You can find more information on the SP22 & SP24 at Nokta Makro. For the name of your closest dealer contact American Detector Distributors (US Distributors)

*Nokta/Makro just added new carbon fiber lower rods to their accessory line…

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As if 2020 wasn’t bad enough…

…..I saw an ad on the History Channel that a new season of “The Curse of Oak Island” will be airing soon. It really is a curse!

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14 Comments

Filed under Metal Detecting

14 responses to “The Simplex SP22 & SP24 Searchcoils – My Take!

  1. Hi Dick:
    Brilliant mate! A great, informative review. Presumably the Simplex is online updateable? How do you rate the wireless system? I’d love to know how it performs over or near saltwater.

    So, if you would drive down to Galveston for me so as to test it on a saltwater beach, I could see my way to dropping the $20 (plus accrued interest) currently owed from1986.

    Is that a deal or is that deal?

    • Is it indeed updateable and the wireless system is terrific. Can’t afford to drive to Galveston at the moment for a lot of reasons….

      I also have no clue what the $20 comment is about. 1986 was before my time.

      • john taylor

        (hot damn!) did we even have detectors back then? i know m.d. 20/20 was around as i was imbibing in ’86.i’m just sayin’

        (h.h.!)
        j.t.

  2. john taylor

    simplex for the simple! (i’ll be in that crowd!) sounds like a detector worth owning,especially knowing how “simple” it actually is to operate. i agree, 6″ concentric coil could make a big difference in super junked out areas. with a snootful of the purple antagonizer in ya, it’s nice to know the simplex will STILL be “simple” just sayin’

    (h.h.!)
    j.t.

  3. john taylor

    simple is as simple does! simplex lives! ehe! he! heh!..i’m just sayin’

    (h.h.!)
    j.t.

  4. john taylor

    yo dickie! they gonna let ya keep that coil? would be an excellent in the “interests ofpublic service” gesture!i’m just sayin’

    (h.h.!)
    j.t.

  5. Tony

    Dick, another good review – thank you! And you scored a silver dime – double bonus for your day/days of testing these coils out.

  6. James Bizzell

    I recently purchased the SP22 coil. I have not been out very much, but I am finding exactly what you report. And, it is exactly what I had suspected. It is better in separating out the goodies in a trashy location then the stock DD coil. This is EXACTLY what I wanted! Now, to get a couple of the carbon fiber lower shafts!

    • Hi James. Sounds like we’re in the same boat – we have the equipment, just need to get out and use it. Hope all is well in your neck of the woods…

  7. LR

    Thanks for the great updated review. Glad your back and knees and Texas Heat held out for you this time round. I am now very interested in the 9.5″ elliptical coil… one thing I miss on my old whites prizm4 is having an elliptical… I’m still saving up for a Simplex+ w/ wireless headset kit. would love to get both the 9.5″ elliptical & 8″ with covers and lower carbon fiber rods for the coils. But money is really tight and saving for a new machine is slow and low on the totem pole of financial obligations for me. good luck DS… Namaste.

    • Luke, not sure it was that good a review, just that both coils do a great job and perform as expected and as advertised. I’m very impressed with Nokta/Makro products.

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