Re-Retired!

Back in the 70’s and 80’s it used to be relatively easy to find a lot of silver. That’s because it also used to be relatively easy to find someplace to swing your coil. Things have changed….

If you’ve been reading my recent postings you know of my renewed attempt to find somewhere new and exciting to detect. I have to tell you, it’s not going all that well. I’m not done but I’m not excited either. Each trip to the library, each ride in the bug, frustrates.

I’ve devoted my time between two libraries. Both are relatively close, cover a realistic radius and have decent resources. One research librarian has taken a liking to me and “claims” she’s still asking the seniors that come in for ideas. The problem I’m encountering is that what was once old has now been altered and is now man-made modern. Forget the archaeological BS that detectorists are stealing the past, it’s not there to even look at or find.

There’s been no shortage of leads when it came to my reading, the problem came when I attempted to follow them up. In almost every case the area I was looking for was no longer available. Thanks to progress, population and greed what used to be is no longer and yes I understand all this is to be expected but that doesn’t make it any more palatable.

The one lead that so far hasn’t fizzled can’t really be verified until later in the year, if even then. I “think” I’ve found an old and very popular swimming/picnicking area but it’s dried up and extremely overgrown. A five-minute visit resulted in being dive bombed by an army of mosquitos.

In the meantime move over John Winter…I’m also an “ex-detectorist”…..

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5 Comments

Filed under Metal Detecting

5 responses to “Re-Retired!

  1. Ed B.

    I totally agree with you about the old sites disappearing for one reason or another. Research is like inventing…..a lot of work and most of the time it results in failure which may then lead to frustration. Sometimes though, a useful invention comes along quite by accident. Good detecting sites can come along the same way.

    Back in 2014 we hunted a researched site that ended up being a total dud as far as finds were concerned and on the way out of town we spotted a place that was modern in appearance but decided to give it a try to take some of the sting out of a fruitless day. We found a pile of clad and it was enough to make us come back another time. It ends up we have dug nearly $500.00 in clad at this site since 2014, a total of 21 hunts there, and I know that sounds like total BS but it’s true. In addition to the clad we’ve dug 7 pieces of sterling jewelry and this past weekend we dug our 10th silver coin, a BEAUTIFUL 1843 seated Liberty Quarter which I submitted to the White’s website for posting and I’m happy to say they posted it. Additionally, this coin was found with an entry level machine, the TREASUREMASTER so it proves that you don’t need a high end overpriced detector to find the good stuff. In the end I guess I could say that the research led indirectly to the accidentally found site so it was a combination of work and luck. I’ll continue to research possible hunt sites but I won’t object to getting lucky either.

  2. Tony

    Dick, I agree with your post. I have been an ardent reader of you posts for many years and over this time you and others state that good research is the key to better sites. That statement is fine I totally agree with it.
    I also agree with you today about the diminishing places to detect. Two winters back we had plenty of cold and snowy weather so I decided to research. My goal was ten sites for the spring. What I found was exactly what your post states, the sites were re-done or were in the process of being re-done with very high chain link fenses around. I did ask each construction manager for access but was only allowed to enter one site out of several. That site had fill dirt and trap rocks already spread over much of the site because they were bringing in Astro Truf in large rolls for a foot ball field. I was able to find two wheat cents around the fringe area but mostly just scrap bass from a broken sprinkler system. Please, I am not complaining but like you have to keep at it and find the one or two that brings home the good stuff.

  3. Ed B.

    My post wasn’t so much about the clad but the fact that it was an old site that we didn’t realize was as old as it was and that it gave us some silver.

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