Thank You Veterans…

flag5Just wanted to take a moment to thank our veterans, both past and present. You’ve given years, and in many cases, the ultimate, defending our country, so that we can live free, in this, the greatest country in the world.  No greater sacrifice can be given. I salute you all, and a special shout out and thank you to Viet Nam vets!

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THANK TO WHITE’S AS WELL!

GREAT TIME TO BUY AND HELP A GREAT CAUSE

Veteran's Day, Mobile

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EASY DOES IT

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As you can see, not a lot going on here in the Stout house… working on the book, and talking to Digger. He’s the only one who listens to me.  I like his advice too…..

Here’s a couple of recent new blurbs…

Detectorist’s Find Declared Treasure Trove

A Matter of Context

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THE WHITE’S TRX VS. THE GARRETT PRO-POINTER

Thanks to Kurt Franz for the following…great job!

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BELLEWOOD PARK

Found the following and just had to post it.  I hunted what was left of Bellewood Park back in the late 70’s and early 80’s, and while it was somewhat rough going, the finds were well worth it.  Now PLEASE, if you live in New Jersey, DO NOT even bother looking for it.  It’s gone!  I was very fortunate to now the owner of the property back then.

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KNOCK ON THAT DOOR!

permission44

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5 Comments

Filed under Metal Detecting

5 responses to “Thank You Veterans…

  1. Bigtony

    Thank you Veterans!

  2. danhughes1

    Free lunch today at Ryan’s Steakhouse for veterans!

    I did my four years in a foreign country called Selma, Alabama. And since I had a degree in broadcasting, the Air Force wisely made me a medic. (And I knew two guys with degrees in biochemistry whom the Air Force made broadcasters.)

    And they say God works in mysterious ways.

    • Funny you say that because my forte was music when I was drafted in 64. You guessed it, they put me in a howitzer battalion. Was there for four months and eventually worked my way into an audition for the 440th Army Band at Fort Bragg. Spent the remaining time playing with a lot of great musicians.

  3. Bigtony

    My dad was put into the 1254th combat engineers in WWII but knew nothing about building roads or engineering.

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