Filed away but not forgotten…

Well you guessed it, nothing new and exciting here on Stout Standards.  Haven’t been out detecting in a while and not sure when I will be.  Couple things holding me up or perhaps I should say keeping me down but keep checking back. Who knows I might just wow you with a silver dime or two or maybe even a cool video (okay, okay I lie a lot). 

Honestly I want  to get out but I am not up to snuff right now and the heat is kicking my ass. Not sure why but I have this unique ability to sweat in an igloo.  Give me low temps in the mid 90’s and I am out of commission.  On the ‘Stout Scale’ it falls between “will think about it” and “nope“.

Anyway I was out in the garage today adjusting the sprinkler system (which can now only run twice a month thanks to the perpetual drought here in Texas) and I decided to open a drawer on an old rusted filing cabinet.   It’s filled with old tekkie material from the 70’s and 80’s.  Despite the heat I got engrossed in all things ancient and pulled a few things out to share here, none of which will probably interest you but ask me if I care?

Forgive the various alignment problems….scanning is not my forte….

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Okay first….who remembers Gardiner detectors?  Early on I hunted with someone who had one and all I can remember is that it gave off this annoying screech like signal.  I also remember it had knobs, switches, buttons and piffwangers galore, not to mention he had to carry it holding on to the stem (control box near the elbow).  Gardiner claimed their detectors were neither TR or BFO (which was the norm back then) but rather VLF.  If you owned one tell me about it.

Gardinercollage

The Gardiner Model 202A and their pocket sized catalog

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Then I came across an old monthly periodical that I subscribed to called the U.S. Treasure Hunter’s Newsletter.  It was written by Michael Bresciani and it came out of New Beford, Massachusetts. The gist of his newsletter, as I remember, was that it was upfront with frank and unbiased reviews of the various metal detectors.  I also seem to remember this gentleman being a priest although I am on my second glass of red so anything is possible. Hopefully one of you will remember this and let me know.

Brescani

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I also came across this Fisher World Treasure News from 1986, touting the efforts of detectorists to assist at the Little Big Horn as well as an article about Glenn and Mary Carson’s humanitarian efforts to help the needy in Western Mexico.

 

BigHorn6
Carsons6

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Next I found an old White’s catalog with a photo of Ken White Sr. and his wife, a gentleman who I will always be indebted to. He was responsible for me being where I am today and I will never forget him.  His letters, phone calls and encouragement kept me plugging away when starting the FMDAC….

KenSr3

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GREAT TIPS FROM DAN HUGHES

Hughes

From my stats it seems that my post on “keywords” garnered a lot of interest and Dan Hughes not only linked to it but added additional tips on how to be even more successful when searching for new sites.  His explanations are easy to understand and I highly recommend you listen to his recent podcast Googling for Treasure, and while you are there be sure to subscribe so that you will receive future updates from Dan.

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PLEASE READ…

A while back I made the decision to not accept comments from two individuals whose only purpose in life is to degrade our pastime. I also reserve the right to not publish comments from anyone hiding behind anonymity and who I feel is nothing more than a fill-in or shill for these same two antagonists.

This incidentally is how they deal with comments on their respective blogs…

“We believe metal detecting should be legally regulated to ensure best practice and maximum public benefit. The world’s archaeologists agree. We are disinclined to provide a platform for those British detectorists who oppose that aim. Any artefact hunter wishing to comment please clarify you support comprehensive regulation else it won’t be published. Thanks.”

Enough said…

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25 Comments

Filed under Metal Detecting

25 responses to “Filed away but not forgotten…

  1. Yo Ricardo:
    That press cutting brought back a few memories from the dim and distant! Good old Henry Cleere, was one of the CBA’s best. You could always rely on Henry to tell it like it wasn’t! But that was his job – to stuff the hobby and mine was to stuff the CBA. I won on points!

    Unlike some of the ill-mannered, ignorant know-nothing pigs currently inhabiting the archaeo- blogosphere, Henry was a gent and played a straight bat and we became friends though acutely aware of our respective tasks.

    Happy days.

    • Indeed that was a good time to be a tekkie. If only we could go back. I was 35, feeling like 25 and now I am 73 feeling like 93. Damn….

      • Well they do say you’re only as old as the woman you feel! Of course that doesn’t apply to thee or me, as neither of us I suspect, want an early death!

        Who took that video of me? Looks like it was near the ‘Mayfly’ where the River Test flows past the main door. Just after lunch as I recall!

        John H
        PS. Did you manage to stumble across that $20 bill in your garage rummaging?

      • John, I did not find that $20 but I did find a yellowed, tattered IOU dated 1984 for the same amount and guess whose signature was on it?

  2. Big Tony from Bayonne

    Gotta love that old MD with the pots controls and a view graph! Too cool.
    Ipswich – my MD friend who passed several years ago was stationed there during WW2 as an airplane mechanic. I must have photo’s around here some place that he gave me.
    Yeah the summer heat is tough as we get older. I know what you mean.

  3. Big Tony from Bayonne

    Oh, did you or John see the article on the British archie find? Something to do with King Arthur and a Round table Knight? Pretty interesting.

    • No, but I will check out. Those damn arkies…probably left big holes.

    • Hya BT from B:
      Nope, didn’t see that one …but did you know there is an Arthurian saying that, ‘Once a King always a King and once a knight is quite enough.’ Or, as the elderly knight, Sir Richard de Stout, was often heard to say…”The Lady Guinevere is my right hand…”

      Regards
      John H

  4. Doug Frantz

    Dick, I enjoy seeing those articles from the “old days”, since I didn’t become involved until 8 years ago. Makes me wish I had started back in the 60s. The piece about the Little Big Horn reminds me that PBS did a show (Nova?) about how they reconstructed the battle using detectors to find locations where bullet casings were dropped.

    • Doug, things have changed dramatically over the years and I often wonder how it would be if I were starting out today. Everything today is fast paced and the technology is getting better with each passing day. Early on the pace was slower, the finds were more plentiful and seeing another tekkie was a rarity. Must say I am glad I started when I did.

  5. For those of you who may have seen my mention of Leanne in the Glenn Carson article above I was referring to Glenn’s daughter, Leanne Boyd. I just found out that she passed away earlier this year. My condolences to her family.

  6. I sure do remember reading that article in Fisher World Treasure News. I have moved so many times that all my old treasure magazines have been trashed by either Dear Wifey or me. Thanks for sharing. Do not know anyone that owned a Gardiner. Didn’t do much detecting with others back then. Was also busy working and raising a family. Did more fishing than detecting.

  7. PLEASE READ…

    A while back I made the decision to not accept comments from two individuals whose only purpose in life is to degrade our pastime. I also reserve the right to not publish comments from anyone hiding behind anonymity and who I feel is nothing more than a fill-in or shill for these same two antagonists.

    This incidentally is how they deal with comments on their respective blogs…

    “We believe metal detecting should be legally regulated to ensure best practice and maximum public benefit. The world’s archaeologists agree. We are disinclined to provide a platform for those British detectorists who oppose that aim. Any artefact hunter wishing to comment please clarify you support comprehensive regulation else it won’t be published. Thanks.”

    Enough said…

    • “We believe metal detecting should be legally regulated to ensure best practice and maximum public benefit .The world’s archaeologists agree. We are disinclined to provide a platform for those British detectorists who oppose that aim. Any artefact hunter wishing to comment please clarify you support comprehensive regulation else it won’t be published. Thanks.”

      Whoever wrote this didn’t realise detecting in the UK is legally regulated and is of considerable benefit to the public with almost ONE MILLION detector-found artefacts being academically studied. When he/she wrote , “We are disinclined to provide a platform for those British detectorists who oppose that aim…” seems to show they SUPPORT the PAS and the thousands of UK artefact hunters who are doing such a great job and the world’s archaeologists agree too!

      It’s all ambiguous I know, but that’s how I read it!

  8. Big Tony from Bayonne

    Wow, are they trying to secure a well paying job for life? Just think if they had to follow around a gaggle of detectorists and write a report back to the commissioner!

  9. Packrat

    Hi Dick Love the references to the old days. Yeah I remember Gardiner and many other old detectors. Would be alot different if were starting out now. Alot of people would give up if they had to detect in all metal all the time.

  10. Joe(TX)

    I know that this is a reply to a really old post but here goes anyway….last year right before my double by-pass heart surgery I was able to acquire a Gardiner 202A…due to my slow recovery process…the detector sat for months untouched. Lately feeling better I have been playing with it mainly doing a bench test and doing a one time field test. I believe that this detector was available around 1978….which is almost 40 years old. The model that I have looks like it was used a few times and put away in a safe and secure place. Very little on the internet on any of the Gardiners let alone the 202A. I found your mention of the 202A so hence I am here. Lots of controls….would probably drive the younger generation of tekkies batty! LOL Lots of knobs do not bother me..on this model it is probably overkill. It is probably my model but mine takes a while to warm up…at least 5 minutes and then it really seems to hum and be stable. I was originally told that this model is a TR but after using it …that cannot be right. It has the depth of a VLF but the sounds are more like a BFO…that is the pitch changes instead of the volume. I started with a Garrett BFO Sidewinder so the BFO type sounds…is very pleasing with me. I have only been out with it one time…found a silver ring and some deep large non-ferrous round disks…not exactly sure what they are? Anyway I like to play and collect some of the older rarer detectors. I am finding out that on some of these…like the 202A …any thing written about it seems to be rarer than the detector itself. Back when I started detecting about 47 years ago there was no internet to be able to share notes and info. We got the once a month Treasure magazine. Any real questions we had to either drive for an hour to get to our dealer or just call him up. So me and my dad learned mainly from Trial and Error…which I still do today. Thanks for your blog…you are an inspiration!

    • Hi Joe, thanks for taking the time to comment here, old post or not. I had a good friend back in the early 80’s who used a Gardiner but I don’t remember the model. It was a BFO.
      He let me try a few times but I just couldn’t get used to the audio. He found a boatload of stuff with it. As I remember it had an oversized box and a long rod, though I am not sure why I say that.

      I would suspect that any Gardiner in working condition would be a rare find today, and those of us who do remember them are getting long in the tooth, LOL. I’ve always regretted not buying those older detectors off Ebay though with the tornado where would they be today? The best collection I know of belongs to Mark Schuessler, FMDAC president. Might be a good source of info on the Gardiner if you need it.

      Thanks Joe for sharing this and maybe I need to do another post on all those oldies…..must be a other few ancient tekkies out there. Have a great Easter.

      • Also if I come across that Gardiner catalog I will send it to you. Most of the garage was salvaged. Only problem is everything is in boxes in storage and we are not moving too fast with emptying it….

  11. Joe(TX)

    Do you have the current address for Mark Schuessler? Thanks!

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